10/17/2017

Aaron here today with E.A. Bethea; Aidan Koch; Kara Walker; Thierry Groensteen; Connor Willumsen

—————————————————————————————————

E.A. Bethea

Book of Daze
Domino Books is publishing a collection of E.A. Bethea work:

Bethea, a simple interpretation might offer, chronicles the web of living in the world (and with her work, we are zeroed in on life in New York City, as this collection reveals itself as a truly local work of art about a city that paradoxically rarely receives its due—for every 1,000 works that gloss over the truth of the city, we have a book like this that has its eye on the reality of daily life in the five boroughs) with a heart and a mind sometimes at odds and sometimes simpatico. But Bethea gives us something more complex: at times, the work feels dead-pan as it shifts from exhilaration to resignation without a change in visual presentation, but it’s here where we have a guide to the heart of Bethea’s project. The often uniform nature of the pages and the highly non-uniform nature of what is contained within become a catalog of days or weeks or years. One page offers a subdued period in life, while the next (seemingly) similar page offers a day full of regret. Bethea talks about her work relating to cinema, specifically calling attention to what happens between one of her panels and the next. The shifts in emotion and carefully chosen images alongside highly precise language feel like walking into a film where the entire crew–from director to actor to gaffer—united in one mind to make something highly exquisite.

—————————————————————————————————

Transmitter​ ​presents:
In​ ​Search​ ​Of
OCTOBER​ ​20 ​–​ ​NOVEMBER​ ​19,​ ​2017
OPENING​ ​RECEPTION​ ​FRIDAY,​ ​OCTOBER​ ​20,​ ​6–9​ ​PM
AIDAN​ ​KOCH​ ​•​ ​DAWIT​ ​L.​ ​PETROS

Transmitter is pleased to present In Search Of, an exhibition pairing the work of Aidan Koch and Dawit L. Petros, two artists who, despite their disparate media, take related approaches to pictorial space in order to create open-ended narratives, notable as much for the space within them as for the connections between different moments. Taking its title from Bas Jan Ader’s In Search of the Miraculous, this exhibition considers these artists’ work in terms of questions and histories of migration, and the search, whether for the sublime or for survival, which underlies human movement. In addressing these issues, Koch and Petros both make significant use of abstraction, and range in their interests from a mythological past to the factual present, and beyond, to the possible future.

Aidan Koch

—————————————————————————————————

‘A prominent critic posted on Instagram that they felt “uncomfortable” being in the room, perhaps a desired effect of the artist.’
Jessica Bell Brown at Hyperallergic takes another look at the Kara Walker show that recently closed:

Ironically, most of the works in Walker’s show will go to museums that will proudly collect them, while for the sake of political neutrality many will likely remain timid when the time comes to roll up their sleeves and speak truth to power. As difficult and divisive as her images are, they point to a reckoning that we can no longer afford to ignore. Racism will remain inseparable from America’s history, its present, and its future. It penetrates every crevice and corner of our institutions, and pervades every fiber of our collective being. Walker’s work does not signal an impending culture war; it is a reminder that the previous ones never ended.

—————————————————————————————————

‘Overall, I’m glad this book exists.’
Nick Mullins on Ann Miller’s translation of Thierry Groensteen’s COMICS AND NARRATION:

The other major theme in this book, which I briefly mentioned above, is rhythm. Groensteen mostly discusses panel layout, but also considers how words affect rhythm. While I liked this, I wished that he had gone further. Layout creates rhythm of course, but so does the relative visual density of the panels. So does the amount of time in the intervened. As I showed above, Groensteen hints at this possibility. Again, the fact the Jason chooses to end his page with a panel that implies a longer space of intervened time creates a change in rhythm to the end of the page. If Groensteen didn’t say this explicitly, he pointed the way. In other words, he has invited us to continue where he left off, which is one of the great gifts of well-written theory.

—————————————————————————————————

 

Anti-Gone En Plein Air
Connor Willumsen provides some insights (‘Cartooning is a lot like magic’, ‘Sometimes I ask myself, why would I want to be a cartoonist?’) in this new video, published by Koyama Press 2017, directed by Fatine-Violette Sabiri.

Get a copy of Anti-Gone, along with two zines – a 20 page bootleg, and a special collage zine – as well as a unique Anti-Gone drawing, as part of the exclusive Connor Willumsen bundle from Comics Workbook – available HERE.

Brian Nicholson reviews Anti-Gone, calling it the “book of the year”.

—————————————————————————————————

Suzy and Cecil – 10-17-2017 – by Gabriella Tito

—————————————————————————————————

Cozytown – 10/17/2017 – by Juan Fernandez [1] [2]

—————————————————————————————————

10/10/2017

Aaron here today with ARTZINES; Kurt Ankeny; Brigitte Findakly and Lewis Trondheim; Gary Panter; Juan Fernández

—————————————————————————————————

Antoine Lefebvre, from ARTZINES #6: Show and Tell

ARTZINES is a transmedia research project run by artist publisher antoine lefebvre editions. This research project aims to produce a reference book on the subject of contemporary art zines. As an artist researcher, it is important for lefebvre to imagine new creative ways of doing research. Therefore, ARTZINES.INFO will allow the public to access the unedited data of this research project as it is collected. This online database and the zines produced by ARTZINES during this research process will show the progress made toward the publication of the book.

—————————————————————————————————

Kurt Ankeny: Mining the Mind’s Eye
Kurt Ankeny talks about the reasoning and philosophy behind why he finds drawing from imagination and memory such a strong approach to cartooning, and how this creates deeper truths via non-photographic image making.

The 195th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  Oct. 10, 2017 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Kurt Ankeny, from In Pieces: Someplace Which I Call Home

—————————————————————————————————

Brigitte Findakly and Lewis Trondheim, from Poppies of Iraq

‘This humorous episode takes on additional absurdity when the subject shifts to a military coup on the next page.’
Mark Peters at Salon.com has some nice things to say about the new book by Brigitte Findakly and Lewis Trondheim, Poppies of Iraq:

Like any great comic, even one about the real world, “Poppies of Iraq” creates its own reality for readers to get lost in — a world told via plain, blunt language and non-realistic, cartoony figures that interweave the personal and political. One of the most subtly brutal sequences in the book involves a marriage. In a tense two pages, Trondheim presents three short conversations consisting of the words “So?” and “Completely.”

—————————————————————————————————

Gary Panter

Gary Panter: HIPPIE TRIP, Oct 12 — Nov 11, Marlborough Contemporary Viewing Room, 545 West 25th Street, NYC.
Via Dan Nadel.

—————————————————————————————————

Expanding the Festival Toolkit
If you haven’t already, please take a look at Juan Fernández’s post about future possibilities and approaches to comics festivals:

Centralize Sales
Our current system is embarrassingly inefficient. It is an ineffective use of getting tens of dozens of skilled comics makers and storytellers in one city for a week or weekend. No more exhibitors expected to stand behind tables hawking wares. Nowadays with everyone behind tables, people are barely interacting. There’s a vital cross-pollination that just doesn’t happen.
What does it look like when a show does away with the flea market model? One thought is that you establish a festival shop.
You get an experienced comics retailer to run the shop. You have them hire a trusted staff. You pay that staff. The shop gets a cut. 30/70. In a model like this, it costs you no money to have your work available.
Under this new kind of model, if you are a guest you sign up to be involved in citywide comics programming. Signings, gallery exhibitions, lectures, workshops. This is the kind of thing that you get Arts and Cultural councils involved in. You sign up because you want to be part of the programming.
With a model like this, you free up the artists and suddenly new horizons open up. Among those horizons are sources for financing. Imagine collaborating with a city’s municipal parks: guided bike tours where throughout the tour you make stops, learn about the city while doing landscape drawings and comics strips of the experience… A series of readings at a bookstore. Gallery exhibitions. Movie screenings at an arthouse theater. There are so many venues that would be amenable to programming: libraries, universities, community centers, theaters, bookstores, parks… Most of these venues have programming budgets that could fund materials and labor for artists.

—————————————————————————————————

Suzy and Cecil – 10-10-2017 – by Sally Ingraham

—————————————————————————————————

Joanie and Jordie – 10-10-2017 – by Caleb Orecchio

10/03/2017

Aaron here today with the continuing Cartoon Crossroads Columbus recap.

—————————————————————————————————

If you haven’t already, please take a look at Caleb Orecchio’s excellent write-up of the recent Cartoon Crossroads Columbus festival. Caleb pretty much covers the entire show, it’s definitely worth the read.

—————————————————————————————————

I was in attendance at that show as well, but only managed to take a few photos.

Winsor McCay’s watercolor board, at the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum

Display of Air Pirates Funnies, Vol. 1 No. 1, at the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum

Floor shot of the show, around 3pm on Saturday

The lovely topiary garden behind the Columbus Downtown Library

Jon ‘Ohio Is For Sale’ Allen, spending all of his earnings at the Sunday after-party

Some downtown Columbus trivia

—————————————————————————————————

Suzy and Cecil – 10-3-2017 – by Gabriella Tito

 

09/26/2017

Aaron Cockle here today with Katie Fricas; Kevin Czap; Louise Bourgeouis; CXC Events

—————————————————————————————————

Katie Fricas

The 193rd meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  Sept. 26, 2017 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Cartoon Fricassee Live!
An illustrated talk on a year’s worth of non-fiction comics by Katie Fricas, including a trip to a pigeon art show at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, the scene in Cleveland outside of the Republic National Convention, forgotten milestones from past summer Olympics, and more.

Katie Fricas is a cartoonist and illustrator in New York City. Her comics have appeared in The Guardian online and on Hyperallergic, Extra Crispy, and The Awl. Her first book of essays will be released in the fall of 2017.

—————————————————————————————————

Fütchi Perf On Tour
Kevin Czap is promoting the recent publication of their Fütchi Perf book by Uncivilized Books, please consider stopping by if you’re in geographical proximity to one of the events.

Kevin Czap

—————————————————————————————————

Louise Bourgeois. Spider Woman. 2004. Drypoint on fabric, sheet: 13 1/2 × 13 5/8″ (34.3 × 34.6 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of The Easton Foundation. © 2017 The Easton Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, NY

Louise Bourgeois: An Unfolding Portrait through January 18, 2018, Museum of Modern Art

The artist’s creative process is the organizing principle behind the exhibition. Over the course of her career, Bourgeois constantly revisited the themes of her art, all of which emerged from emotions she struggled with for a lifetime. Also, she said there was no “rivalry” between the mediums in which she worked, noting that “they say the same thing in different ways.” Here, her prints and illustrated books will be seen in the context of related sculptures, drawings, and paintings, and within thematic groupings that explore motifs of architecture, the body, and nature, as well as investigations of abstraction and works made from old garments and household fabrics. In addition, the evolving states and variants of her prints will be emphasized in order to reveal Bourgeois’s creative thinking as it unfolded.

Louise Bourgeois, The Ladders

—————————————————————————————————

Comics Workbook Workshops at CXC
Comics Workbook will be conducting a number of workshops over the course of this upcoming weekend at the Cartoon Crossroads Columbus show. These will be led by Connor Willumsen with assistance from Frank Santoro, and will run on a more-or-less hourly basis on the Saturday and Sunday of the festival, so please check the schedule and try to attend one (or several) if you can.

Comics Workbook Workshop Featuring Connor Willumsen
Columbus Metropolitan Library, Downtown Branch, Homework Help Room
The educational workshops hosted by Pittsburgh’s Comics Workbook focus on visual theory applied in practical fashion to any kind of comics making a cartoonist can imagine and can benefit any way a student of the form might wish to improve. This year’s special host is the remarkable visual talent Connor Willumsen, with guest-star teachers dropping in and out throughout the weekend. Walk-ins welcome.

—————————————————————————————————

Suzy and Cecil – 9-26-2017 – by Sally Ingraham

—————————————————————————————————

09/19/2017

Aaron Cockle here today with Anti-Gone Tour Dates; the International Human Rights Cartoon Award; Teju Cole on Marie Cosindas; David Salle on Rei Kawakubo; John Hankiewicz’s Education; Tac au Tac

—————————————————————————————————

Anti-Gone on Tour
Connor Willumsen is touring in support of his new book, available now from Koyama Press. Noel Freibert and Patrick Kyle will also be joining Willumsen on the tour.

—————————————————————————————————

International Human Rights Cartoon Award
Via Maren Williams at the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund:

Exiled Iranian cartoonist Kianoush Ramezani, who was forced to flee his native country when the regime took notice of his work in 2009, has established a new international prize to recognize cartoonists who are speaking out on issues of human rights anywhere in the world. Submissions for the International Human Rights Cartoon Award are open now until Nov. 30 through Ramezani’s organization United Sketches.

—————————————————————————————————

‘…an ensorcelled world that included flowers, vases, dolls, lace, fur, rugs, porcelain, books, chairs, oranges, asparagus, posters, ornaments, statues, dancers, dandies, sailors, tarot cards, masks and puppets, but also those portals into other worlds — paintings, mirrors and windows — that collectively constituted a highly personal vision of reality enamored of theatrical effects and attuned to the inner life of inanimate things…’
Teju Cole looks at the photography work of Marie Cosindas (among other topics), in the longest single sentence ever published by the NY Times.

…much as Cosindas carefully selected subject matter and, through technical know-how and visual intelligence — a skillful deployment of lighting, filters, exposure times, developing times and ambient temperature for florals but also other genres, including portraits and assemblages of objects of all kinds for which she disliked the term “still life,” rightly rejecting any connotation of stasis, and for which she preferred “arrangement” — turned it into indelible statements about what photography could achieve more than half a century after pictorialism’s heyday, with a use of color that was more soulful, by being somehow both freer and more disciplined, than what was generally seen in commercial color of the 1960s, and that came into the world earlier than the work of some other great color photography pioneers like William Eggleston, whose style was more deadpan, less arranged, less obviously artful and more in keeping with the preference of critics and curators, once they acquired a taste for it, for what art photography in color should look like, though the louche and antiquarian work that Cosindas made did result in considerable fame for her in the ’60s and ’70s, with solo exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art (before Eggleston), the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the Art Institute of Chicago, but did not win her glory in most standard histories of photography, in which other artists, mostly younger than she and almost all male, are credited as the true pioneers of color, so that she came to be seen as an anomaly, neither modern nor contemporary, in part because her particular contribution to photography was mystical, sensuous, unashamed of beauty and grounded in the combination of everyday objects with exotic ones, an earnestness that fit awkwardly with the ironic and occasionally cynical tastes that dominated the last half-century but put her firmly in the line of many artists in history who were revolutionary not by founding a new school of thought but by discovering unexpected life in old approaches, not in keeping with the times but rather timeless,…

—————————————————————————————————

‘For this interplay of references to have real weight, there must be at least hints of a discernible visual syntax.’
David Salle looks at length at the Rei Kawakubo exhibit, which just ended its run at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

The exhibition design, a collaboration between Kawakubo and the Met curators, follows no perceptible chronology. Enclosures of various shapes—inverted cones, flattened spheres and semicircles, keyholes, ovals, triangles—contain the clothes, which are grouped by collection or theme. These frames are rendered in white plasterboard and lit from above by dense rows of fluorescent tubes, making a shadowless space, objective in tone. They are like viewing platforms, some of which function as small proscenium stages, while others are more like theater in the round. Still others are like caves whose restrictive openings give only a partial view of the clothes within. There is no attempt to make the clothes themselves look inhabited. Dresses and other garments are displayed on mannequin forms supported by thin metal rods, like sculpture. They are what Giacometti’s figures would be wearing had they taken the time to get dressed.

—————————————————————————————————

EDUCATION, by John Hankiewicz
Henry Chamberlain at the Comics Grinder blog looks at John Hankiewicz’s most recent book.

Yes, this is a very arty book but it avoids becoming an academic hot mess. Much to enjoy in simply accepting a greyhound head as a beam of light. Much to enjoy in a disjointed narrative if done right. There is certainly a long tradition of artists using text that doesn’t really seem to match the adjacent imagery. Think of Magritte and his play with text and image. Ever mindful of that, no doubt, Hankiewicz seems to relish his playing with text and image, and delightfully recontextualizing images, just like playing improvisational jazz.

John Hankiewicz, from Education

—————————————————————————————————

Tac au Tac
Juan Fernández has a write-up (with extensive links) to the French TV program from 1969-1975 that brought cartoonists together to engage in improvisational drawing.

The concept was simple, efficient, and allowed for many variations: A huge, blank white page and cartoonists equipped with just a simple marker. A theme was proposed (ex. invasion or pursuit), sometimes a visual starting point (simple line, spiral, circle), and the authors improvised, either collaboratively with their peers, or in a duel facing off against their opponents. The result was often far more than a juxtaposition of drawings, it was often a real visual dialogue between cartoonists.

—————————————————————————————————

Suzy and Cecil – 9-19-2017 – by Sally Ingraham

—————————————————————————————————

09/12/2017

Aaron Cockle today with results of the 2017 Composition Competition; Kara Walker; Sally Ingraham; Trevor Paglen; CBLDF at SPX

—————————————————————————————————

Comic Workbook Composition Competition 2017 Winners
Congratulations to all who created and submitted work for this contest. We really enjoyed reading each and every work.

FIRST PLACE – Weeklong Comics Workbook Rowhouse Residency ($500 value)
Sienna Cittadino – Girl’s Bathroom
SECOND PLACE – $250 gift certificate at Copacetic Comics
Chris Kohler – Living Room
THIRD PLACE – $100 gift certificate at Copacetic Comics
Sara Sarmiento – Deep Clean
HONORABLE MENTIONS – $50 gift (each) at Big Planet Comics
Jillian Fleck – Push Thru
Louis Deux – Touristing
Simon Reinhardt – Slow Theft
Foxitalic – Hangover Haiku
It is our hope that all of the makers who participated in this contest have been TRANSFORMED in some way – artistically, personally, spiritually, and/or physically (improved eye-hand coordination? yes!) – by the time and energy dedicated to the creation of their submissions. Everyone who took part in this exercise has completed a hero’s journey.

—————————————————————————————————

Kara Walker, September 7 – October 14, 2017

Sikkema Jenkins and Co. is Compelled to present The most Astounding and Important Painting show of the fall Art Show viewing season!

Kara Walker, Storm Ryder (You Must Hate Black People as Much as You Hate Yourself)

Collectors of Fine Art will Flock to see the latest Kara Walker offerings, and what is she offering but the Finest Selection of artworks by an African-American Living Woman Artist this side of the Mississippi.  Modest collectors will find her prices reasonable, those of a heartier disposition will recognize Bargains! Scholars will study and debate the Historical Value and Intellectual Merits of Miss Walker’s Diversionary Tactics. Art Historians will wonder whether the work represents a Departure or a Continuum. Students of Color will eye her work suspiciously and exercise their free right to Culturally Annihilate her on social media. Parents will cover the eyes of innocent children. School Teachers will reexamine their art history curricula. Prestigious Academic Societies will withdraw their support, former husbands and former lovers will recoil in abject terror. Critics will shake their heads in bemused silence. Gallery Directors will wring their hands at the sight of throngs of the gallery-curious flooding the pavement outside.  The Final President of the United States will visibly wince. Empires will fall, although which ones, only time will tell.

Kara Walker, Christ’s Entry into Journalism

—————————————————————————————————

The SPX Interviews: Sally Ingraham on Teaching and her Daily Strip Suzy & Cecil
CW’s Sally Ingraham is interviewed over at The Beat, in the first of a series of SPX-related pieces. Congrats, Sally!

Philippe Leblanc: You’re working on creating a comics curriculum for girls. Can you tell us a little bit more about this project.

Sally Ingraham: We all need good examples to follow, and it’s especially important for girls to have other cool women to look up to. As I pursue my own development I have been looking for masters of the medium that I can more readily identify with, and this has led me to the obvious conclusions: There are and have been loads of female cartoonists, but their work is still under-documented, less celebrated, and straight up forgotten. I’m interested in developing a comics curriculum for girls that documents, celebrates, and remembers the women who came before us while making new spaces for the women working today, and the ones that will be making comics tomorrow. I won’t exclude the comics of the many male cartoonists whose work I admire and aspire to, but I want to push the balance in a different direction with my own curriculum, placing the emphasis on female creators first. I’m in the development stages at the moment, still learning as much as I can from whomever will teach me, but I’ve discovered very quickly that I can’t sit around waiting for someone else to make the moves that I see opening up on the board – I’ve got to stay in the game.

—————————————————————————————————

Trevor Paglen: A Study of Invisible Images
September 8 – October 21, 2017

Trevor Paglen, A Study of Invisible Images. Installation view, 2017

Trevor Paglen’s A Study of Invisible Images is the first exhibition of works to emerge from his ongoing research into computer vision, artificial intelligence (AI) and the changing status of images. This body of work has formed over years of collaboration with software developers and computer scientists and as an artist-in-residence at Stanford University. The resulting prints and moving images reveal a proliferating and otherwise imperceptible category of “invisible images” characteristic of computer vision.

Paglen’s exhibition focuses on three distinct kinds of invisible images: training libraries, machine-readable landscapes, and images made by computers for themselves. For Machine-Readable Hito, for example, Paglen took hundreds of images of artist Hito Steyerl and subjected them to various facial recognition algorithms. This portrait of Steyerl presents the images alongside metadata indicating the age, gender, emotional state and other signifiers that the algorithms have interpreted from the images. In another portrait in the show, Paglen trained facial recognition software to read the face of philosopher Frantz Fanon. A ghostly image of Fanon shows the facial signature–the unique qualities of a face as determined by biometric recognition software–used by computer vision to identify an individual.

To make the prints in Adversarially Evolved Hallucinations, Paglen trained an AI to recognize images associated with taxonomies such as omens and portents, monsters, and dreams. A second AI worked in tandem with the first to generate the eerie, beautiful images that speak to the exuberant promises and dark undercurrents characterizing our increasingly automated world.

—————————————————————————————————

CBLDF at SPX
This year’s annual Small Press Expo Lecture is The Comic Book Legal Defense Fund: Comics & The Power of Intellectual Freedom

Friday, September 15, 2017, 12-1PM, Library of Congress Madison Building, West Dining Room, 6th floor; Metro Stop: Capitol South

A trend that began in the 1940s continues today—challenges to comic books! Charles Brownstein, Executive Director of the non-profit Comic Book Legal Defense Fund, will share the history of comic book censorship from the medium’s origins to the present day.  Participants will learn about the history of comic book censorship, and how that history still informs challenges to graphic novels happening right now. Learn what CBLDF does to protect this valuable medium, discover some of the most frequently challenged comics and graphic novels, and what you can do to make a difference. Emerge from this session with a new or renewed passion for comics, graphic novels, and manga and as a strong advocate for protecting this form of free speech! A selection of comic books from the Serial and Government Publications Division will be on display. This is the sixth annual SPX festival program sponsored by the Serial & Government Publications Division. http://www.loc.gov/rr/news/calendar.html

—————————————————————————————————

A Cosmic Journey – 9-12-2017 – by Cameron Arthur

This concludes A Cosmic Journey – look for the whole comic archived here on Comics Workbook soon!

—————————————————————————————————

Suzy and Cecil – 9-12-2017 – by Sally Ingraham

09/05/2017

Aaron Cockle here today with Comics Carousel; Anders Nilsen’s new book; Josh Bayer returns to the New York Comics & Picture-story Symposium; Workshops at SPX

—————————————————————————————————

—————————————————————————————————

Anders Nilsen

‘But those books were both black and white. Color kind of forces your hand regarding borders.’
Paste Magazine has a nice piece about Anders Nilsen’s new book, Tongues, and the process that went into its making. 

“Panel design and structure matter a lot to me. I did a bit of teaching from 2012 to 2015 or so and one of the things I found myself focusing on with certain students was how panels work and what happens to storytelling when they change in various ways. Some cartoonists do great things with a simple grid. My two biggest comics influences, Hergé and Chester Brown, use very simple panel structures in their comics, and they were brilliant with it. But I can’t keep from playing around with panels. Partly it’s because I find measuring out rectangles very boring, but it’s also, I think, partly because I studied painting, and so I can’t help but think about the visual composition of a page as more than just a collection of rectangles. It was something I wanted to explore in this book from the outset and so this small sketch is my original idea for how to structure the panels in this opening dream sequence.”

Anders Nilsen

—————————————————————————————————

Josh Bayer, Adam McGovern and guests on All Time Comics
All Time Comics is a comic-book series that resists categorization. Part modern reworking of Bronze age comics superhero  aesthetics, part a Mad Magazine-like Gonzo attempt to  sidestep and weave that aesthetic back on itself. Published by Fantagraphcs, All Time Comics has created a space for a dialogue between older veteran creators like Herb Trimpe and Al Milgrom and younger Alternative Comics mainstays like Ben Marra and Noah Van Sciver. Join Josh Bayer in a lively discussion with comics writer/historian Adam McGovern. (Panel may include special guest artist/writers, schedules permitting).

Josh Bayer is the author of Raw Power and Theth from Retrofit Comics, the editor of the Suspect Device Comics anthology series, as well as 2016’s The Black Hood. His work’s been selected for The Best American Comics series in 2016 and 2017. He is the founder of  his own “Comics Are The Enemy Press” and he is currently releasing his All Time Comics imprint from Fantagraphics.

—————————————————————————————————

Comics Workbook Cartoon Workshops
If you’re planning to be at the upcoming Small Press Expo in Bethesda, MD, please consider attending one or all of the workshops the CW will be conducting:

—————————————————————————————————

Frank Santoro made a comic book about his parents and now he needs help making a handbound copy of the book for each of them. It’s a good story. Check out the Indiegogo campaign HERE – or if you want to contribute via PayPal, look at the campaign HERE.

————————————————————————————————

A Cosmic Journey – 9-5-2017 – by Cameron Arthur

————————————————————————————————

Suzy and Cecil – 9-5-2017 – by Gabriella Tito

————————————————————————————————

Joanie and Jordie – 9-5-2017 – by Caleb Orecchio

 

 

08/29/2017

Aaron Cockle here today with Mitochondrial Comics (sort of); Andrea Tsurumi; Programming Schedules for Small Press Expo + Brooklyn Book Festival + NY Art Book Fair; Jack Kirby in NYC; Anders Nilsen, also in NYC

—————————————————————————————————

Seth Shipman

“We can create a layer of abstraction where you don’t need to know about RNA folding to design a circuit out of RNA”
This may be a stretch, as far as comics news goes, but with this new method of data storage, we may one day be able to carry around comics (and a lot of other things) within our bodies:

To get a movie into E. colis DNA, Shipman and his colleagues had to disguise it. They converted the movie’s pixels into DNA’s four-letter code—molecules represented by the letters A,T,G and C—and synthesized that DNA. But instead of generating one long strand of code, they arranged it, along with other genetic elements, into short segments that looked like fragments of viral DNA.

E. coli is naturally programmed by its own DNA to grab errant pieces of viral DNA and store them in its own genome—a way of keeping a chronological record of invaders. So when the researchers introduced the pieces of movie-turned-synthetic DNA—disguised as viral DNA—E. coli’s molecular machinery grabbed them and filed them away.

The movie they stored was a 36-by-26-pixel GIF of one of the first moving images ever recorded: a galloping mare named Annie G., by Eadweard Muybridge­ in 1887. The team was able to retrieve it, along with a separate image, with about 90 percent accuracy by sequencing the bacterium’s genome.

—————————————————————————————————

Andrea Tsurumi, from Girls Who Code

New Work by Andrea Tsurumi
Tsurumi has been busy, providing illustrations for Reshma Saujani’s book, Girls Who Code: Learn to Code and Change the World, along with work at the Nib, Trumpcare is Bad News for Freelancers,  and she also has a launch party for her new book, Accident!, on Thursday, October 5 at Books of Wonder in NYC. Keep up the good work, Andrea!

Andrea Tsurumi, from Accident!

—————————————————————————————————

Programming Schedules for Upcoming Shows

—————————————————————————————————

Jack Kirby

Life and Legacy of Jack Kirby – August 27-30, 2017
As a follow-up to Caleb’s post from yesterdayOn view until Wednesday, August 30 at One Art Space, 23 Warren Street, Street Level Gallery 1, NYC.

—————————————————————————————————

—————————————————————————————————

A Cosmic Journey – 8-29-2017 – by Cameron Arthur

—————————————————————————————————

Suzy and Cecil – 8-29-2017 – by Sally Ingraham

—————————————————————————————————

08/22/2017

Aaron Cockle here today with Graphic Medicine; Santoro PDFs; Eclipse Comics

—————————————————————————————————

Excerpts from Graphic Medicine #1
Due to the generosity of anonymous benefactors, CW has acquired a copy of the comic published in support of the most recent Comics and Medicine conference.

Mita Mahato

Left: Walt Whitman/David Lasky; Right: Judith Margolis

Rennie Burke

Meredith Li-Vollmer

—————————————————————————————————

Santoro Treasure Trove
Please consider supporting Frank Santoro’s Indiegogo project. As a way of raising funds, he’s collected the past 10+ years of work he’s posted on various blogs, including Comics Comics. 666MB and counting. I took some quick screenshots from the first 3 PDFs that have been sent out.

BEST OF COLD HEAT BLOG

Frank Santoro, from BEST OF COLD HEAT BLOG

Layout Workbooks, Color Workbooks, and Notes on Scroll Comics

Frank Santoro, from Layout Workbooks, Color Workbooks, and Notes on Scroll Comics

BEST OF COMICS COMICS

Frank Santoro et al; image by Ben Jones, from BEST OF COMICS COMICS

—————————————————————————————————

Eclipse Comics, not to be confused with Eclipse Comics

Beawiharta/Reuters

NASA/F. Espenak

NASA

NASA

NASA

AstroPixels

—————————————————————————————————

A Cosmic Journey – 8-22-2017 – by Cameron Arthur

—————————————————————————————————

Suzy and Cecil – 8-22-2017 – by Gabriella Tito

—————————————————————————————————

Joanie and Jordie – 8-22-2017 – by Caleb Orecchio

 

08/15/2017

Aaron Cockle here today with Maqsood-I-Kainaat; Tom of Finland; Wolk on Borges; FRAME Festival Open Call; Fake Photos!

—————————————————————————————————

Maqsood-I-Kainaat, by Shreyas R Krishnan

Maqsood-I-Kainaat, by Shreyas R Krishnan
The 12th issue of the Ley Lines series is coming soon!

Ley Lines is a quarterly publication dedicated to exploring the intersection of comics and the various fields of art & culture that inspire us. Co-published by Grindstone Comics and Czap Books.

From Maqsood-I-Kainaat, by Shreyas R Krishnan

—————————————————————————————————

Tom of Finland, the Movie
Touko Laaksonen gets the biopic treatment, and a fancy review at the Guardian.

 

Considering the film’s subject matter, it actually contains very little sex – the main bedroom scene cuts from a kiss to the morning after. “The core fans were always saying: ‘I’ve seen the drawings, those are my sex, now I want to see the story of the man I idolise,’” says [director Dome] Karukoski. “So the amount of gay sex will come very much from the dramatic need. Where is the line where it becomes provocation? [When] it overrides the emotional balance of the story.”

Instead, much of the film focuses on the struggles Laaksonen endured as a gay man in conservative Finland, from facing jail as a young man after a pick-up went awry, to facing constant pressure from his younger sister never to express his true identity, since she believed it would bring shame on the family. “Even when I told her about him being accepted into the permanent collection at MoMA, her response was: ‘Well, what were they thinking?’” says Dehner, still hurt by the memory. The film, he says, is “touching – how terrible society has been to us and how conditional the love is from family members”.

—————————————————————————————————

Webmaster Borges
This is from way back in 1999, and probably the first piece I read by Douglas Wolk. Jorge Luis Borges and the Internet:

Canny Borges never names the Web, of course: As “The Garden of Forking Paths” points out, in a riddle whose answer is chess, the only word that cannot be used is “chess.” But the meaning of his parables is specific and undeniable. The Aleph in the fiction of the same title, the portal through which one can see every point in the universe, is Netscape Navigator in all but name. The Zahir, an object that changes its form over time but monopolizes its owner’s attention forever, is none other than Microsoft Internet Explorer, as anyone who’s tried to unstick it from a computer’s operating system only to click fatally on an innocuous icon will tell you. (Consider, in fact, the alphabetical remove of Borges’ names for the browsers, his subtle jest on the Alpha and Omega of his new world.)

—————————————————————————————————

Prague Comic Arts Festival Open Call

Sign up for the FRAME festival and become a part of an emerging festival, full of comics, zines and illustrations! We welcome all small publishers, authors and illustrators. OPEN CALL is until 31.8. 2017. Each exhibitor can choose from two options for his presentation – a small table 110 x 55 cm or a large table 220 x 55 cm. The jury of Centrala and No Ordinary Heroes will then select approximately 50 exhibitors who will be contacted with detailed information on arrival and installation no later than September 10, 2017.

—————————————————————————————————

‘Research suggests that regardless of what you might think about your own abilities to spot a hoax, most of us are pretty bad at it.’
The BBC has a handy guide to spotting fake photos:

Another giveaway is the colour of people’s ears. “If the Sun is behind me, my ears will look red from the front because you’ll see the blood,” he says. “If the light is coming from the front, you won’t see the red in the ear.”

—————————————————————————————————

A Cosmic Journey – 8-15-2017 – by Cameron Arthur

—————————————————————————————————

Suzy and Cecil – 8-15-2017 – by Sally Ingraham

—————————————————————————————————

Joanie and Jordie – 8-15-2017 – by Caleb Orecchio