03/28/2018

Juan Fernandez on Pepo’s EL CONDORITO and the Spring Semester of thee Santoro Correspondence Course for Comic Book Makers!

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El primer libro de Condorito  por Pepo esta descargable gratuitamente en el sitio de la Bibilioteca Nacional de Chile. You can now download the first collection of Chile’s national treasure, Condorito.

Condorito is lazy, charming, and irresponsible. It’s a wonderful, top notch gag strip full of character. The strip was created in 1949 by René Ríos Boettiger(Pepo) in Chile as a specific response to the arrival of the American cultural offensive offensive to conquer South America ideologically via Walt Disney in 1942. His eponymous strip has been one of the most popular in all Latin America, in part because it is unmistakably Chilean.

Download your copy of this 100+ page PDF HERE!

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The sterilization of Condorito

Over on The Week, Lili Loofbourow‘s written a piece in response to Condorito‘s CGI arrival to the big screen. Her piece does a good job contextualizing Condorito in today’s media landscape and what is wrong with the latest movie. Condorito is a victim of the “design by committee” process that sterilizes anything that is ever intended for children…

Essential to El Condorito is Pepo’s attention to sense of place. Pelotillehue, Condorito’s hometown, is a real, scrappy town with nooks and crannies and a history of its own. Akin to Carl Barks’/Don Rosa’s Duckburg in their respective Donald Duck comics, we learn and laugh as much from graffiti and street corners as we do from the strip’s gags.

Lili Loofbourow: It’s hard to overstate how different Disney’s version of Chile as a paradise with snowy peaks and tidy houses is from Ríos’ irreverent corrective. Condorito’s world is hard and adult, and his town, Pelotillehue, is dirty and vital and populated by all kinds of weirdos. There’s Don Máximo Tacaño (Sir Maximal Stingy), a miser in tattered finery who’ll do the absurd to save a buck. There’s Ungenio (literally A Genius), a buck-toothed imbecile with the best intentions. There’s Garganta de Lata (Tin Throat), a red-headed alcoholic whose wife routinely awaits his return from the bar with a bowling pin. And then there’s Yayita, Condorito’s bombshell girlfriend, and her large and fearsome parents, Don Cuasimodo and Doña Tremebunda.) They had higher hopes for their daughter than a condor in patched pants who routinely brings her flowers ripped from her own yard.

You can read it all HERE.

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Announcing the Spring Semester of thee Santoro Correspondence Course for Comic Book Makers

8 weeks! $500 bux! 10 spots available!

Rolling start date because of spring break – start as early as March 30th 2018.

Deadline to apply is April 12th.

Read all about the course HERE and email santoroschool@gmail.com for more details or to apply.

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Suzy and Cecil – 3-28-2018 – by Gabriella Tito

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Joanie and Jordie – 3-28-2018 – by Caleb Orecchio

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Juan Fernández

Juan Fernández

Juan José Fernández is a Pittsburgh comics community organizer, most recently named as one of “Pittsburgh’s Creative Forces: 12 People to Meet in 2017” in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, and one of seven 2016 Fuerza awardees by Café Con Leche for providing Pittsburgh Latinx leadership. He co-organizes the annual Pittsburgh Zine Fair, leads the Pittsburgh Comics Salon, and provides educational outreach for the Comics Workbook and the ToonSeum. He currently works at the Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council.
Juan Fernández

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